Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a behavioural disorder that includes symptoms such as inattentiveness, hyperactivity and impulsiveness

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/attention-deficit-hyperactivity-disorder-adhd/

 

Atopic eczema (atopic dermatitis) is the most common form of eczema, a condition that causes the skin to become itchy, red, dry and cracked.

Atopic eczema is more common in children, often developing before their first birthday. However, it may also develop for the first time in adults.

It's usually a long-term (chronic) condition, although it can improve significantly, or even clear completely, in some children as they get older.

 

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/atopic-eczema/

Constipation is common and it affects people of all ages. You can usually treat it at home with simple changes to your diet and lifestyle.

 

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/constipation/

Chickenpox is common and mostly affects children, although you can get it at any age. It usually gets better by itself within a week without needing to see a GP.

 

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/chickenpox/

You can often treat a cold without seeing your GP. You should begin to feel better in about a week or two.

 

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/common-cold/

Most coughs go away on their own within 3 weeks. There's usually no need to see a GP.

You should:

  • rest
  • drink plenty of fluids
  • drink hot lemon with honey (not suitable for babies)

Hot lemon with honey has a similar effect as cough medicines.

 

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/cough/

Cradle cap is the greasy, yellow scaly patches that sometimes appear on the scalps of young babies.

It is common, harmless and doesn't usually itch or cause discomfort. Do not pick at the scales as this can cause an infection.

Cradle cap is not contagious and is not caused by poor hygiene or an allergy

It usually appears in babies in the first two months and clears up without treatment within weeks to a few months.

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/cradle-cap/

 

Croup is a condition that affects babies' and young children's airways. It's usually mild, but call NHS 111 or see a GP if you're worried.

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/croup/

 

Diarrhoea and vomiting are common in adults, children and babies. You can have them together or on their own.

They're usually caused by a stomach bug and should pass in a few days.

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/diarrhoea-and-vomiting/

 

Ear infections are very common, particularly in children. You don't always need to see a GP for an ear infection as they often get better on their own within 3 days.

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/ear-infections/

 

High temperature is very common in young children. The temperature usually returns to normal within 3 or 4 days.

A normal temperature in babies and children is about 36.4C, but this can vary slightly from child to child.

A fever is a high temperature of 38C or more.

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/fever-in-children/

 

Impetigo is a skin infection that's very contagious but not usually serious. It often gets better in 7 to 10 days if you get treatment. Anyone can get it, but it's very common in young children.

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/impetigo/

 

Mumps is a contagious viral infection that used to be common in children before the introduction of the MMR vaccine.

It’s most recognisable by the painful swellings at the side of the face under the ears (the parotid glands), giving a person with mumps a distinctive "hamster face" appearance.

Other symptoms of mumps include headaches, joint pain and a high temperature, which may develop a few days before the swelling of the parotid glands.

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/mumps/

 

Norovirus, also called the "winter vomiting bug", is a stomach bug that causes vomiting and diarrhoea. It can be very unpleasant, but usually goes away in about 2 days.

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/norovirus/

 

Oral thrush in babies and young children is a fungal infection in the mouth that's usually harmless and easily treatable.

Although babies and young children are particularly at risk, oral thrush can also affect adults.

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/oral-thrush-in-babies/

 

Ringworm is a common fungal infection. It's not caused by worms. You can usually buy medicine from a pharmacy to make it go away.

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/ringworm/

 

Scabies is not usually a serious condition, but it does need to be treated.

A pharmacist will recommend a cream or lotion that you apply over your whole body. It's important to read the instructions carefully.

You'll need to repeat the treatment 1 week later.

Scabies is very infectious but it can take up to 8 weeks for the rash to appear.

Everyone in the household needs to be treated at the same time – even if they don't have symptoms.

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/scabies/

Slapped cheek syndrome (fifth disease) is common in children and should clear up on its own within 3 weeks. It's rarer in adults but can be more serious.

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/slapped-cheek-syndrome/

 

Tonsillitis is a common childhood illness but teenagers and adults can get it too. It usually goes away on its own after a few days.

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/tonsillitis/

 

Urinary tract infections (UTIs) in children are fairly common, but not usually serious. They can be effectively treated with antibiotics.

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/urinary-tract-infections-utis-in-children/

 

Whooping cough, also called pertussis, is a highly contagious bacterial infection of the lungs and airways.

It causes repeated coughing bouts that can last for two to three months or more, and can make babies and young children in particular very ill.

Whooping cough is spread in the droplets of the coughs or sneezes of someone with the infection.

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/whooping-cough/

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